A systematic review of workplace disclosure and accommodation requests among youth and young adults with disabilities

<p><b>Purpose:</b> The objective of this systematic review is to critically appraise the literature on disability disclosure and workplace accommodations for youth and young adults with disabilities.</p> <p><b>Methods:</b> Systematic searches of nine international databases identified 27 studies meeting our inclusion criteria. These studies were analyzed with respect to the characteristics of the participants, methodology, results of the studies and the quality of the evidence.</p> <p><b>Results:</b> Among the 27 studies, 18,419 participants (aged 14–33, mean 23.9 years) were represented across seven countries. Barriers to disability disclosure and requests for workplace accommodations were found at the individual (i.e., disability type, severity, poor self-concept, and advocacy skills), employment (i.e., type of industry, and working conditions, lack of supports), and societal levels (i.e., stigma/discrimination). Facilitators of disability disclosure included individual factors (i.e., knowledge of supports and workplace rights, self-advocacy skills), employment (i.e., training/supports, effective communication with employers, realizing the benefits of accommodations), and societal factors (i.e., positive attitudes toward people with disabilities). There was little consensus on the processes and timing of how disability should be discussed in the workplace among youth with disabilities.</p> <p><b>Conclusions:</b> Our findings highlight the complexities of disability disclosure for youth with disabilities. More studies are needed to explore issues of workplace disclosure and accommodations for young people to improve disclosure strategies and the process of providing appropriate accommodations.Implications for Rehabilitation</p><p>Clinicians, educators, and parents should support youth to become self-aware and build self-advocacy skills so they can make an informed decision about how and when to disclose their condition to employers.</p><p>Clinicians, educators, and employers should help youth with disabilities to understand the benefits of disclosing their disability, and educate them on the supports available so they can remain healthy and productive in the workplace.</p><p>Clinicians should advocate for employers to create a positive and supportive environment where youth feel comfortable disclosing their condition.</p><p></p> <p>Clinicians, educators, and parents should support youth to become self-aware and build self-advocacy skills so they can make an informed decision about how and when to disclose their condition to employers.</p> <p>Clinicians, educators, and employers should help youth with disabilities to understand the benefits of disclosing their disability, and educate them on the supports available so they can remain healthy and productive in the workplace.</p> <p>Clinicians should advocate for employers to create a positive and supportive environment where youth feel comfortable disclosing their condition.</p>