Chromosome instability caused by mutations in the genes involved in transcription and splicing

2019-08-13T05:29:34Z (GMT) by Kimihiko Sugaya

Mutations in molecules involved in transcription and splicing can cause chromosome instability such as sister chromatid exchanges. We isolated and characterized responsible genes from mammalian temperature-sensitive mutant cells showing chromosome instability. A mutation in the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II affected DNA synthesis in S phase-arrested cells, resulting in abnormal induction of sister chromatid exchanges. The yeast mutant harboring a homologous mutation showed very similar phenotype to that of the mammalian mutant. A mutation in Smu1, which is involved in splicing, also affected DNA synthesis in S and G2 phase-arrested cells, resulting in abnormal induction of sister chromatid exchanges and chromosomal aberrations. These cells showed a connection between defects of RNA metabolism and induction of chromosome instability. Genome instability appeared to be caused by links between RNA metabolism and replication resulting in genomic recombination. RNA metabolism can be regarded as one possible driver of genome modification triggering genome evolution