Does power mobility training impact a child’s mastery motivation and spectrum of EEG activity? An exploratory project

Purpose: The purposes of this exploratory project were: (1) to evaluate the impact of power mobility training with a child who has multiple, severe impairments and (2) to determine if the child’s spectrum of electroencephalography (EEG) activity changed during power mobility training.

Study design: A single-subject A–B–A–B research design was conducted with a four-week duration for each phase. Two target behaviours were explored: (1) mastery motivation assessed via the dimensions of mastery questionnaire (DMQ) and (2) EEG data collected under various conditions. Power mobility skills were also assessed.

Methods: The participant was a three-year, two-month-old girl with spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy, gross motor function classification system level V. Each target behaviour was measured weekly. During intervention phases, power mobility training was provided.

Results: Improvements were noted in subscale scores of the DMQ. Short-term and long-term EEG changes were also noted. Improvements were noted in power mobility skills.

Conclusions: The participant in this exploratory project demonstrated improvements in power mobility skill and function. EEG data collection procedures and variability in an individual’s EEG activity make it difficult to determine if the participant’s spectrum of EEG activity actually changed in response to power mobility training. Additional studies are needed to investigate the impact of power mobility training on the spectrum of EEG activity in children who have multiple, severe impairments.Implications for Rehabilitation

Power mobility training appeared to be beneficial for a child with multiple, severe impairments though the child may never become an independent, community-based power wheelchair user.

Electroencephalography may be a valuable addition to the study of power mobility use in children with multiple, severe impairments.

Power mobility training appeared to impact mastery motivation (the internal drive to solve complex problems and master new skills) in a child who has multiple, severe impairments.

Power mobility training appeared to be beneficial for a child with multiple, severe impairments though the child may never become an independent, community-based power wheelchair user.

Electroencephalography may be a valuable addition to the study of power mobility use in children with multiple, severe impairments.

Power mobility training appeared to impact mastery motivation (the internal drive to solve complex problems and master new skills) in a child who has multiple, severe impairments.