Postural asymmetry in non-ambulant adults with cerebral palsy: a scoping review

2019-04-22T08:56:22Z (GMT) by Carlee Holmes Kim Brock Prue Morgan
<p><b>Purpose</b>: Non-ambulant adults with cerebral palsy are vulnerable to development of postural asymmetry and associated complications. The primary aim of this scoping review was to identify postural deformities in non-ambulant adults with cerebral palsy.</p> <p><b>Materials and methods</b>: Comprehensive searches were undertaken in EMBASE, CINAHL, AMED, Cochrane, Psych INFO, and Joanna Briggs (1986–Jan 2017), supplemented by hand searching. Two reviewers independently extracted data using a customised tool focusing on study design, participant characteristics, postural descriptors, measurement tools, and interventions.</p> <p><b>Results</b>: From 2546 potential records, 17 studies were included. Variability in populations, reporting methodology, and measurement systems was evident. Data suggest more than 30% of this population have hip migration percentage in excess of 30%, more than 75% experience “scoliosis”, and more than 40% demonstrate pelvic obliquity. Estimates ranged from 14% to 100% hip and 32% to 87% knee contracture incidence. Conservative interventions were infrequently and poorly described.</p> <p><b>Conclusion</b>: Many non-ambulant adults with cerebral palsy experience postural asymmetry associated with windswept hips, scoliosis, pelvic obliquity, and limb contracture. Options for non-radiographic monitoring of postural asymmetry should be identified, and conservative interventions formally were evaluated in this population.Implications for rehabilitation</p><p>The common postural asymmetries of windswept hips, scoliosis, pelvic obliquity, and limb contracture require standardised clinical measurement.</p><p>Radiography is most commonly used to monitor postural asymmetry in this population, but standardised positioning is not applied and may not be feasible indicating a need for alternate methods and rigorous documentation.</p><p>The Posture and Postural Ability Scale may be considered for use in the management of body shape in adults with CP.</p><p></p> <p>The common postural asymmetries of windswept hips, scoliosis, pelvic obliquity, and limb contracture require standardised clinical measurement.</p> <p>Radiography is most commonly used to monitor postural asymmetry in this population, but standardised positioning is not applied and may not be feasible indicating a need for alternate methods and rigorous documentation.</p> <p>The Posture and Postural Ability Scale may be considered for use in the management of body shape in adults with CP.</p>